International Union for the Study of Social Insects (IUSSI2018), August 5-10, 2018 in Guarujá, Brazil.

only days left!
Find us: Ft

Social networks and disease transmission

Author(s):
Christoph Kurze, Yizhe Zhang , Shweta Bansal , Danny Chen , Ephraim Hanks , David Hughes
Institution(s):
Department of Entomology, Penn State University, State College, United States; Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, United States ; Department of Biology, Georgetown University, Washington DC, United States ; Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, United States ; Department of Statistics, Penn State University, State College, United States ; Department of Entomology, Penn State University, State College, United States
Although group-living may increase the overall fitness of individuals, it also facilitates the transmission of infectious diseases. Understanding the impact of population size, density, social interactions and environmental complexity on transmission is critical for being able to predict epidemic spread under novel conditions. We use the carpenter ant Camponotus pennsylvanicus to study the spread and transmission of a GFP-(green fluorescent protein)-labeled generalist pathogen (Metarhizium robertsii) as model system. Using modern microscopy and tracking of individual ant movement based on machine-learning algorithms allows us to study disease dynamics in complex scenarios (i.e. altering group sizes and nest architecture). We will present empirical data on ant movement, proximity networks, pathogen distribution and transmission collected from 48 nests (from 8 colonies).
Back